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Seasons Archives: 2015-2016

Dining for the Arts Kick-Off Party

Join us as we put the fun in “Fundraiser!” Friends of the Ashtabula Arts Center are warmly invited to our annual Dining for the Arts Kick-Off Party, at Pairings, Ohio’s Wine and Culinary Experience, in Geneva.

All details can be found online, including how to RSVP.

Wineglasses for web Food for web

 

Next to Normal

Adult:$15.00
Senior/Student:$13.00
Child 12 & Under$11.00
Advance sale ticket price only.For tickets at the door, add $2. Advance sale tickets must be purchased by 4 p.m. on a Thursday or Friday for that evening’s performance, or by noon on a Saturday for Saturday/Sunday performances.
Music by Tom Kitt

Lyrics & Book by Brian Yorkey

The Goodmans look like a typical suburban family, but behind the picture-perfect walls of their house, demons are stirring. Diana Goodman, wife and mother, has been battling depression for years, and the fight is taking its toll on both her and her family. Unflinching and compassionate, Next to Normal features a rock musical score that won a Tony Award in 2009.

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The Wedding Singer

Adult:$15.00
Senior/Student:$13.00
Child 12 & Under:$11.00
Advance sale ticket price only.For tickets at the door, add $2. Advance sale tickets must be purchased by 4 p.m. on a Thursday or Friday for that evening’s performance, or by noon on a Saturday for Saturday/Sunday performances.
Music by Matthew Sklar

Lyrics by Chad Beguelin

Book by Chad Beguelin & Tim Herlihy

It’s 1985, and Robbie Hart is a wedding singer looking forward to marrying the love of his life—until she leaves him at the altar. When he befriends Julia Sullivan, a catering waitress, at a gig, life starts looking up. But Julia’s about to marry her Wall Street banker boyfriend, and if Robbie wants to win her heart, he’ll have to hit all the right notes.

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The Music Man

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Rummage Sale

Spring cleaning? Bring any gently used items to the arts center after January 1, then come back Saturday and Sunday, May 21-22, to browse our rummage sale.

Hot dogs and snacks will be available in our concession stand. We’re open rain or shine – see what new treasures you can find!

All proceeds benefit the Ashtabula Arts Center.

Auditions for “Nunsense”

Auditions will be held on Sunday, January 24 and Tuesday, January 26 from 6:30 p.m. – 8 p.m. for the G.B. Community Theatre production of Nunsense by Dan Goggin at the Ashtabula Arts Center. Auditions are first come, first served. The production will be directed by Christy Seymour.

In this musical comedy, the Little Sisters of Hoboken discover that their cook has accidentally poisoned 52 members of their order, and there’s no money for burials. To raise the funerary funds, the surviving sisters put on a variety show and channel their inner stars, taking to the stage to get their departed off ice.

Performance dates: April 7-9, April 15-17, April 22-24
Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., Sunday at 2 p.m.

Those auditioning should prepare a monologue and song, and bring a list of calendar conflicts with them to the audition. All levels of actors from veterans to first-time auditioners are encouraged to try out. There will also be a need for backstage volunteers to build sets, paint, work with props, etc. If you are interested in working as a stagehand or have auditioning questions, contact Kimberly Godfrey at (440) 964-3396.

Seussical Jr.

Adult:$13.00
Senior/Student:$11.00
Child age 12 and under:$9.00
Advance sale ticket price.Add $2 when paying at the door. Advance ticket sales must be purchased by 4 p.m. on Friday for Friday performances and by noon on Saturday for Saturday and Sunday shows. All ticket sales are final.
by Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty based on the works of Dr. Seuss
presented by the Youth Theater Production Class

directed by Caitlin Rose

Full of music and color, this adaptation of favorites by Dr. Seuss centers on a young boy who discovers a familiar striped hat and begins to imagine a fantastic world populated with characters from Horton Hears a Who!, The Cat in the Hat, One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish, and more.

Seussical (3)

13 The Musical

Adult:$13.00
Senior/Student:$11.00
Child age 12 and under:$9.00
Advance sale ticket price.Add $2 when paying at the door. Advance ticket sales must be purchased by 4 p.m. on Friday for Friday performances and by noon on Saturday for Saturday and Sunday shows. All ticket sales are final.
by Dan Elish and Robert Horn
with Music and Lyrics by Jason Robert Brown
presented by the Youth Theater Production Class

Directed by Kimberly Godfrey

Evan Goldman is almost 13 and anticipating his Bar Mitzvah. But his big plans for an amazing party are disrupted by his parents’ impending divorce and a move from New York City to Appleton, Indiana. suddenly the new kid in a small town, Evan finds himself making both friends and rivals, caught between popularity and loyalty. He does his best to figure out friendship, love, and growing up, all on his way to 13.

13 (3)

 

Spence & Brian: It’s Not Faire

Adult:$25.00
General Admission Seating.
Spence Humm and Brian Howard are both working comedians with thousands of shows under their belts. They have performed all over the world, including the Great Lakes Medieval Faire, and are now bringing their live comedy to the arts center.

More information about them can be found on their website, where you can buy tickets online. You can also buy tickets through the arts center by calling (440) 964-3396 or stopping by.

Spence & Brian

 

Auditions for “Almost, Maine”

Casting call! Auditions will be held on Tuesday, December 1, and Wednesday, December 2, at 6:30 p.m. for the G.B. Community Theatre production of Almost, Maine by John Cariani. Auditions will be held at the Ashtabula Arts Center, 2928 W. 13th Street in Ashtabula. Auditions are first come, first served. The production will be directed by Stephen Rhodes.

Almost, Maine  features a series of short vignettes in which residents of a small, fictional town fall in and out of love in unexpected (and sometimes hilarious) ways. The original production of Almost, Maine had only four actors, two women and two men.  Though it is possible to cast up to 19 actors, the show will be cast based off of auditions.  There may be a possibility of having actors double in different roles. A description of characters is detailed below.

Performance dates will be February 19-21 and February 26-28.

Those auditioning should prepare a monologue and bring a list of calendar conflicts with them to the audition. All levels of actors from veterans to first-time auditioners are encouraged to try out. There will also be a need for backstage volunteers to build sets, paint, work with props, etc.  If you are interested in working as a stage hand or for auditioning questions, contact Kimberly Godfrey at (440) 964-3396.

DETAILED INFORMATION ABOUT THE PLAY AND CASTING: 
Here is a description of the people of this place and the tone of the play written by the author.

The people of Almost, Maine are not simpletons. They are not hicks or rednecks. They are not quaint, quirky eccentrics. They don’t wear funny clothes and funny hats. They don’t have funny Maine accents. They are not “Down Easters.”  They are not fishermen or lobstermen. They don’t wear galoshes and rain hats. They don’t say, “Ayuh.” 


The people of Almost, Maine are ordinary people. They work hard for a living. They are extremely dignified. They are honest and true. They are not cynical. They are not sarcastic. They are not glib. But this does not mean that they are dumb. They’re very smart. They just take time to wonder about things. They speak simply, honestly, truly, and from the heart. They are never precious about what they say or do.


Please keep in mind that “cute will kill this play. 
Almost, Maine is inherently pretty sweet. There is no need to sentimentalize the material. Just… let it be what it is – a play about real people who are really truly, honestly dealing with the toughest thing there is to deal with in life:  love.

Act I
PROLOGUE / INTERLOGUE / EPILOGUE – Pete and Ginette, who have been dating for a little while. They are in their very early 20s, both a bit shy, nerdy, introverted. They are not big talkers.

HER HEART – East, a repairman, and Glory, a hiker. Late 20s, early 30s. East is a confident, wise, and even-keeled man. Glory is slightly nervous, and vulnerable, but very self-possessed. They are both very honest and straightforward.

SAD AND GLAD – Jimmy, a heating and cooling guy; Sandrine, his ex-girlfriend; a salty Waitress. All early 20s. Jimmy has a bit of the frat boy in him and in this scene he has already had a few beers. Sandrine is much more “together” by comparison. They broke up a while ago. The Waitress is very enthusiastic and busy. She may appear as if she’s had too much coffee.

THIS HURTS – Marvalyn, a woman who is very good at protecting herself, and Steve, an open, kind fellow whose brother protects him. Late 20s. Both are very kind, maybe a bit awkward and definitely vulnerable.

GETTING IT BACK – Gayle and Lendall, longtime girlfriend and boyfriend. In this scene, Gayle needs to be really fed up with Lendall, and he is very surprised by her outburst. This is not typical of her.

Act II
THEY FELL – Randy and Chad, two “County boys.” Two normal, average, all-American guys, early 20s. They are best friends and have known each other for years. During the course of the scene, they discover they are in love with each other.

WHERE IT WENT – Phil, a working man, and his hardworking wife, Marci. A middle-aged couple who have been together for a long time. They begin the scene in denial and it deteriorates from there. This is the first time in a long time that they’ve expressed their real feelings to each other.

STORY OF HOPE – A Woman, Hope, who has traveled the world, and a Man, Daniel, who has not. They are an older couple, perhaps in their 30s, maybe early 40s. Hope is figuring out her life’s path. Both will spend the scene reflecting on past choices. They are both very sensible and kind.

SEEING THE THING – Rhonda, a tough woman, and Dave, the not-so-tough man who loves her. Both in their 20s. Rhonda is very enthusiastic, opinionated and a bit of a “bulldozer.” She could also be played as super awkward. Dave is cautious around her but also knows that if anyone can tell her the truth, he can.  At the end of the scene, they anticipate, with anticipation, sleeping together for the first time.

EPILOGUE – Pete/Ginette (from Act I Prologue)

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